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Topic: Simple Sail Rig SOT  (Read 1564 times)

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kaz

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This is a photo of a Necky Dolphin 14,  with the JNR 1.5m sail.  It's a knock-off of the Pacific Action Sail,  and retails for $150.  The rigging/masts/cleats ect.  were fabricated using common hardware store stuff.  The process of rigging took about 2 hrs. and this thing actually works. 

www.topkayaker.net/Articles/SurfSail/JNR-KayakSail.html


On my Trident 13,  with a light wind (about 5+ mph) the yak was sailing at 2.4 mph downwind.  Unfortunately,  the winds were variable,  but the sail also allowed for reaching across the wind (sailing perpendicular to the wind direction).  They say that tacking (sailing upwind at some angle) is possible,  but I'll need a steady 5-10 knots to try real tacking.  With the right wind,  I'm hoping for speeds of 5-7 mph or better. 


I've also made a detachable leeboard.  Will be testing soon. 
« Last Edit: August 25, 2019, 10:49:13 AM by kaz »
Cape Falcon F1 (homemade, skin boat)
Trident 13
Necky Dolphin 14


Sailfish

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Nice looking homemade sail you got there.  Thanks for sharing Kaz.
"Life is not about waiting for the storms to pass...it's about learning how to dance in the rain."


kaz

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Nice looking homemade sail you got there.  Thanks for sharing Kaz.

I can't take credit for the sail,  I only managed the rigging.  The sail is by JNR.  I thought about sewing the sail, but after pricing a used sewing machine and the materials it didn't make sense.  They only charge $150 for the sail. 

This week,  winds will be steadily increasing.  I expect winds of 10-15 mph by Tues.  There's a protected back bay in my area.  We'll give the sail a good run. 
Cape Falcon F1 (homemade, skin boat)
Trident 13
Necky Dolphin 14


NowhereMan

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Very cool setup. How quickly can you dump the wind in case you start to lose stability?
Veni, piscis vici!


Eddie

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Curios about the leeboard, I have the 1.5 pacific action but it’s kinda scary to get used to sailing in stronger winds... :smt006
Word to the wise if your mama aint' taught ya' "Don't stand in front of a man and a fish he aint' caught yet.  Brock Zeman song "I'm goin' fishin"

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kaz

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Very cool setup. How quickly can you dump the wind in case you start to lose stability?

I haven't had a day with substantial wind (more than 5-10 mph),  but in trials,  it's easy to manipulate the sail to spill wind.  In fact,  for a beam reach,  it's necessary to loosen one sheet to allow the sail to form a proper airfoil.  This video shows a yak sailor on a reach.  Pacific Action Sail crossing wind via @YouTube


In  sudden gusts of wind,  the masts will spill wind by bending.  My DIY masts are made of schedule 40, 1/2" PVC pipe (about 1-1/8" outside diameter).  To stiffen the masts,  (2) 1/2"  dowels are inserted.  One dowel is 4' and the other is 2'. 


In my area,   the light summer breezes are starting to change.  As fall approaches the winds will steadily increase. 
Cape Falcon F1 (homemade, skin boat)
Trident 13
Necky Dolphin 14


kaz

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Curios about the leeboard, I have the 1.5 pacific action but it’s kinda scary to get used to sailing in stronger winds... :smt006


Oh yes,  I understand and share your concerns with strong winds.  For example, in my youth,  I used to scoff at Small Craft Warnings.  Little did I know that Small Craft Warnings pertained to vessels 45'  and under (I thought that they meant canoes while I was in a leaky 14' PB).  When sailing today,  I always wear full survival gear:  drysuit, offshore PFD/with radio, flares, whistle, strobe ect.  I have also added flotation to the bow and stern of my yak (either pool noodles in a dry bag or inflatable yak-floats).  I also practice sailing in a large back bay with incrementally increasing exposure.  Nothing builds confidence like facing rough conditions,  in a semi-controlled environment. 


I'm also heartened by the videos at Pacific Action  that show a yak sailor in 15-25 knots of wind.  These sails will automatically spill wind.  The flexible masts bend in gusts of wind.  I also have learned to keep a wary eye on cat's paws (ruffled/dark water approaching my yak).  I adjust the sail to spill wind and/or steer the yak off the wind...before the gusts hit my sail. 


I've enclosed a photo of my leeboard.  The leeboard is made of 1/8" scrap aluminum,  and the bracket is made of 1" PVC board (used for exterior house trim).  It is detachable.  I attach the bracket to my yak with (2) 1/4" bolts.  The leeboard can also be swiveled up...it is attached to the bracket with a bolt/wingnut.  I've learned about leeboards by reading the books of Phil Bolger (legendary small boat naval architect). 


Since yaks do not have a keel/centerboard they suffer from excessive leeway (sideways or downwind drift instead of forward motion).  I'm hoping that my leeboard will improve the yaks close-hauled (upwind) performance.  If you are interested in more pics of the leeboard just send me a message.  It is all experimental,  but  I'm impressed that these sails drive my yaks with relative ease.   

 
Cape Falcon F1 (homemade, skin boat)
Trident 13
Necky Dolphin 14


 

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