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Messages - tedski

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 24
1
General Talk / Re: Kayak SF to Hawaii
« on: June 09, 2021, 07:45:14 AM »
Thanks indeed.  We need a running tedskiís tales of the sea thread.

Outside of a pandemic, I usually prefer to save the sea stories for over beers or on the yaks... they're much more fun to tell that way.

2
General Talk / Re: Kayak SF to Hawaii
« on: June 09, 2021, 07:43:47 AM »
Interesting....how far offshore would they have rescued this guy?  What happens if he needs rescue in the middle of the pacific, would CG coordinate with ships in the vicinity or is he on his own?

They're the Coast Guard, not the Mid-Ocean Guard.  The scenario you're describing would be all the U.S. Navy and the navies of various countries.  Yes, the Coast Guard might launch a C-130 for SAR.  But the Jayhawk helicopters have an effective range of about 400 miles, and cutters don't carry a helicopter of their own.  If the helo could reach a cutter, the cutter would be much too far from the scene to be of any use.

I flew USCG helicopters out of CGAS San Francisco.  We would eliminate one crewman, strip every non-essential scrap of gear, including some radios, and remove all of the insulation allow for extra fuel to extend our range, but there were still emergencies to which we could not respond because they were too far out and there was rarely a cutter with a flight deck in the area.  I can remember only three times we staged on a cutter out of  700+ SAR flights in which I participated.

The Jayhawk is far more advanced than the helicopters I flew, but still, they aren't going out all that far.  They have to have enough fuel to hover on station for the rescue and then return to base.

As you know, the medium- and high-endurance cutters have flight decks and receive an Aviation Detachment when they go on patrol.  Part of PACAREA's requirements to meet SAR readiness is to have flight decks at sea and ready in various locations at all times.  Yes, the 65 doesn't have the best range, but the cutter can close a bit of range and the helo can launch from there.  Just wanted to clarify for those not familiar that while a cutter doesn't have "it's own helo,"  it has a helo on it... just happens to be from an Air Station somewhere else.  For example, my cutter was based out of Alameda and we deployed with helos from Air Stations SF, Astoria, San Diego, Honolulu and in one exception of needing armed helos we had a detachment from CGAS Pensacola back when the Augusta MH-68 first came to the fleet.

3
General Fishing Tips / Re: preventing corrosion on FF wiring
« on: June 08, 2021, 04:59:11 PM »
Followup question: When you do get enough corrosion to mess up the connection so your FF stops working, how do you clean it off those tiny connectors?

So far the grease is working for me, but my buddy didn't find out about that trick in time. He can't figure out how to get at the tiny pins without messing them up. I suspect the sockets could be carefully scraped with welding-tip cleaner wires - although that's tricky too, if they get sprung and don't grip the pins tightly enough.

So have any of you managed to fix this problem once it happens?

Iíve had very good luck using CLR (Calcium Lime Rust) remover. Soak it with that for a bit and then use a stiff toothbrush or similar. A small pick tool can also be used to scrape any tough spots.

CLR is also a great choice.  Its main ingredient that's effective in this case is lactic acid.  Same kind of process as what I outlined with citric and hydrochloric.

4
General Talk / Re: Kayak SF to Hawaii
« on: June 08, 2021, 01:45:03 PM »
Great information, thanks for sharing. 

Ever since hearing about the sinking of the Erik down in Baja and then reading up on the fish n fool rogue wave incident Iíve always wondered what happens out there. 

The Erik was a Mexican fishing vessel with a passenger crew of mostly American anglers onboard and they didnít get assistance for 10-12 hours.  With a foreign vessel like that Iím sure the Mexican Navy takes the lead but does the USCG coordinate with them if thereís enough ďAmericanĒ presence on board? What if it was a US Flagged vessel in Mexican waters?

If the vessel was truly in Mexican waters (12 nm from the baseline), then technically speaking it would be a Mexican government problem.  However, we have a lot of bilateral agreements and memorandums of understanding with the Mexican government to provide mutual aide for law enforcement and search and rescue purposes.  If there was a cutter in the area (and there usually is due to ongoing drug interdiction operations), then they would make contact with the Mexican government and request permission to enter their territorial seas to provide assistance.  Those communications channels are already active and that process is done in minutes, not hours.

10-12 hours for a response on the high seas is pretty good.  I can speak from experience that even when we were up in the Bering Sea operating as the main flight deck cutter in the area, some response times are measured in days.  Figure a 400' ship is going to have a top speed of somewhere between 30 and 35 knots.  If the vessel in distress is 300 nm away, that's 10 hours to get on scene -- in good weather.  Add in 15' seas and that 30 knots quickly becomes 10-15 knots and response times soar.  Add to that that 300 nm is "close."  There was a time when we were operating about 600 nm off the coast of Costa Rica and had to respond to the Galapagos Islands.  That is a few days' transit.  After working an operation down there, we were asked to make best speed to somewhere about 80 nm off the coast of central Mexico.  You get the idea... response times can be slow on the water.  That's why for vessels taking on water, sometimes the best initial response is to get a C-130 in the air and have them drop pumps to the vessel.  That can buy a lot of time -- if they get there in time.  I can't begin to tell you how fast vessels can go down.  It's been more than one occasion that we were on scene within an hour and the only thing we ever got to pick up were survival suits and debris.  Meaning the crew had time to get the gumby suits out of the bag, but not enough time to put them on, something they regularly drill to do in 90 seconds.

5
General Talk / Re: hilarious
« on: June 08, 2021, 11:54:14 AM »
That guy only made it 70 miles after planning his trip for 3 years.

Turns out... you can't predict the weather that far in advance ;)  His craft kept him safe as designed and the decision to abort was based on how long he'd have to endure the current weather system under the human factors that can't be "planned for."  He was unable to eat due to illness and the weather wasn't forecast to let up for a number of days.  I feel like it was a well-funded, well-planned attempt at a very challenging endeavor -- only 1 other person has ever done this, if I remember correctly.  Sometimes you fail when you try to do things that are super challenging.

6
General Talk / Re: hilarious
« on: June 07, 2021, 08:45:49 PM »
 :smt044

7
General Fishing Tips / Re: preventing corrosion on FF wiring
« on: June 07, 2021, 07:05:00 PM »
Followup question: When you do get enough corrosion to mess up the connection so your FF stops working, how do you clean it off those tiny connectors?

So far the grease is working for me, but my buddy didn't find out about that trick in time. He can't figure out how to get at the tiny pins without messing them up. I suspect the sockets could be carefully scraped with welding-tip cleaner wires - although that's tricky too, if they get sprung and don't grip the pins tightly enough.

So have any of you managed to fix this problem once it happens?

Use either citric acid or hydrochloric acid and rinse with distilled water immediately.  Citric acid can be found in some specialty grocery stores in the canning supplies area.  Hydrochloric acid can be found at your local hardware store as "muriatic acid."  Wear gloves and protect your face holes as you see fit.  Soak up some acid on a q-tip and press it into the female sockets a bit to wring some out.  Give that a few seconds, then immediately immerse and agitate in (or flood with) an excess of distilled water.  Similar for the pins.  Shake and blow dry and then apply dielectric grease -- super thin coating on o-rings and terminals.

8
General Talk / Re: Kayak SF to Hawaii
« on: June 07, 2021, 03:00:47 PM »
Interesting....how far offshore would they have rescued this guy?  What happens if he needs rescue in the middle of the pacific, would CG coordinate with ships in the vicinity or is he on his own?

First they would coordinate with any ships in the vicinity that are closer than any cutters currently on patrol.  In parallel, they'd divert a cutter or two in the direction of the kayaker's position.  One of those cutters would have a flight deck and helo crew on board to launch when they are within range.  They might also launch a fixed wing aircraft (usually a C-130 out here) to get eyes on scene and run coordination efforts from above.  The US Navy also partakes in SAR operations under direction of the USCG, so if there were any available Navy ships nearby with a flight deck, they could launch a SAR crew, too. 

9
General Talk / Re: Kayak SF to Hawaii
« on: June 07, 2021, 01:16:52 PM »
    I think people who do these things should have to pay the cost of the rescue effort.   
    He put the entire CG crew in a needless danger having to pull his dumbass out of the water.     

I disagree.
Someone else might think any of us are crazy and asking for trouble and should therefore foot the bill for any rescue we might need.
My understanding is that these services are free in order to prevent people from having to make the difficult decision of calling for help, knowing it will cost them thousands of $$$.

This is exactly right.  The USCG does have cost schedules for repeat negligent offenders (read: intentional false alarms that cause assets to launch and conduct search and rescue) and also for planned events (e.g. you want USCG support for an offshore yacht club event).  This may be the case for Cyril's passage, too, since he was planning a known dangerous trip and had plenty of sponsorship.  However, you are free to be as dumb as you want and the USCG will be there to give you a free ride home.  You may get some fix-it tickets once you get back to shore if you weren't carrying the required gear per the carriage requirements, but those are remedied without fees and via photos in the mail so they're very low on the inconvenience scale.

Don't hesitate to call the USCG -- they are trained in triaging your situation and deciding whether launching assets is necessary, so let them make that decision.

10
General Talk / Re: Kayak SF to Hawaii
« on: June 07, 2021, 12:57:38 PM »
The conditions weren't crazy by USCG standards anyway.
I've seen the Coasties parked in the breakers of Pacifica Esplanade beach, stern to the shore just getting beat up by huge surf. Some kind of exercise in group vomiting or the raddest reverse surfing ever.  Either way I'm stoked they're out there working to sort out the sh!t sandwiches our ocean going collective serve up.
The USCG has a school up in the state of Washington for that ,Tedski would know more.

<threadjack>
What you observed was probably a 47' Motor Life Boat out of Station Golden Gate conducting surf drills.  Those are the self-righting boats that are rated at 20' breaking surf (30' seas) and 50 knot winds.  As you can imagine, maintaining station in breaking surf so your crew can recover a victim alongside would be quite challenging.  So, sitting in the surf and building that muscle memory of feeling the boat move under you, jockeying the throttles to keep the bow into the dominant force and maintaining situational awareness of water depth and surrounding hazards/changing conditions is a good drill to make a regular occurrence.  Each morning, they have to get underway and go out to the Potato Patch Shoal outside the gate and provide an on-scene "bar report."  If there's no breaking surf on the bar, they then go to other areas like Pacifica or Ocean Beach to get those drills knocked out.  The folks that are doing this are called Surfmen.  They're the elitist boat operators in the USCG.  They train at the school Spiffy referenced up at Cape Disappointment.
</threadjack>

11
General Talk / Re: Kayak SF to Hawaii
« on: June 07, 2021, 11:18:02 AM »
    I think people who do these things should have to pay the cost of the rescue effort.   
    He put the entire CG crew in a needless danger having to pull his dumbass out of the water.     

Widely publicized feats like these are usually handled in close coordination with the USCG.  Often times, they are paying the USCG for their services.  From everything I've gathered while following this trip closely, this was not a situation where they went and called 911 and launched a helo on a SAR case without any warning.  The USCG has been tracking this event, Cyril's team has been in touch with the USCG as the conditions were declining and the decision was a coordinated decision between all parties of when to pull him off.

I'd much rather have those types of SAR cases than the random sailboater that gets demasted in shitty weather and pops their EPIRB.  The conditions weren't crazy by USCG standards anyway.

12
Thanks again, Eric!

For the rest of ya...

This trip was for my wife, Ellen's birthday.  The Redwoods are her favorite place on earth and we visit the Avenue of the Giants a few times a year.  Usually, it's a day trip from the house we rent in Albion.  For her birthday, we decided to stay at the Benbow Inn and be nearer the Avenue so she could get more time in the trees.  A bit after that idea came to be, I saw Eric's post about a previous trip through the Old Growth groves on the South Fork of the Eel River and thought, "we gotta do that for her birthday."  This year, her birthday fell on Memorial Day, so I was concerned Eric might not want to work holidays or already be booked, but I guess my tendencies to plan thoroughly in advance were worth something this time.  Eric had an opening and we penciled it in.  We knew it would be iffy due to flows given our lack of rain this year.  We discussed pricing based on the gear we'd supply and the gear Eric would supply and his pricing was easily agreeable.

Fast forward to the week before the trip and Eric reaches out to make sure everyone's still good to go and gave us the thumbs up of the trip!  Flows were good enough to get it done if you were wiling to do some walking over the riffles.  Air temps and water temps were forecasted to be high enough that I was going to be wearing more sun protection clothing than immersion gear.  Some base layers and board shorts were gonna do the trick.  Ellen was getting excited knowing the trip was a go.  She's a super chill, spend time in the woods and take in the smells and sounds type, so a chill paddle through Redwoods with some walking and swimming breaks is right up her alley.  When we arrived at Benbow and got checked in and settled, I called Eric and we nailed down meeting spot & time, what to bring, what to expect.  Eric even followed up with a text summarizing everything we'd just said. 

We got to the launch and after some chit chat and meeting David, Eric briefed everyone on the expectations, cautions, plans, etc.  We shuttled some vehicles to our take out point, Eric got his truck parked and we were on the water.  It was a fantastic day -- slight breeze, temps in the 90s, clear skies.  We made a few stops along the way to either swim or hike up some creeks to get into the Redwoods and view some flora and fauna.  We had to walk about 3 or 4 riffles, but I kind of enjoyed the break from sitting.  It had novelty as someone who only ever kayaks on ocean waters.  Ellen was enthralled... she had never seen the Avenue of the Giants trees at such a slow speed!!  She was just taking it all in contently.  She's usually quite the shutterbug, but she only took 3 or 4 photos the entire paddle because she didn't want to waste a moment of taking the trees in.

Traffic on the river was super light and the section of the river that Eric chose had only a few heavily populated banks the entire day.  The trip felt secluded, even on Memorial Day.  At take out, we all soaked up some rays to dry off while reviewing the trip over a few beers.  We got Eric back to his truck and David hung out with the boats at take out.  We parted ways with Eric and Ellen was just smiles the entire ride back to Benbow.  She said that paddle had made the entire trip and it was only day 2 of 4... quite the experience.  She was super thankful for Eric's time.  She enjoyed his conservation mindset, his respect for the land and desire to adopt and embrace the ways the Native Americans respected the land.  She sees the world in a similar way as Eric, so she felt honored to learn from him.  It was a long day in the sun and that usually exhausts her, but she was energized.  It was pretty damn cool to see and she was stoked for her birthday paddle.

Best yet... she now wants a kayak of her own.

13
Recipes / Re: Ellen's Stuffed Sardines
« on: May 28, 2021, 11:43:08 AM »
Iíve never followed them but wondered if it would be worth taking the throw net out in Monterey Bay

From my research, sardines are most commonly found in the southern parts of the bay (think straight out from Coast Guard Pier) and sabiki is probably more common than cast net.  Go get 'em!

14
General Talk / Re: Memorial Day
« on: May 28, 2021, 11:35:33 AM »
Thanks for posting this.  It's really awkward when folks are thanking you for your service on Memorial Day and you know it comes from the best intentions and don't want to correct them on the spot and make them feel bad.

Let's pour one out for our shipmates and fellow soldiers who made the ultimate sacrifice.

15
Wanted To Buy / Re: Wanted: old fishing gear for veterans
« on: May 28, 2021, 07:51:52 AM »
What's your timeline for getting this stuff?  Is there a deadline?  As a fellow veteran, I certainly want to chip in, but I won't be able to sort gear and get things ready for pickup/delivery for another week.  Does that work for you?

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