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Topic: "Sea-run" brown trout in the Trinity River...do they really exist?  (Read 6960 times)

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Clayman

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Has anyone actually ever caught a trout in the ocean?  I have always heard that it is next to impossible.  Never heard why exactly, just far-fetched sounding stuff that makes steelhead in the ocean sound more like the boogie man.  On any account... given the nature of rainbows, and their migratory habits, it really wouldn't surprise me to find out that most trout are at the very least "capable" of going to sea.
I've heard the same thing about steelhead in the ocean: pretty much impossible to find, let alone catch!  And the research on steelhead migratory habits in the ocean is pretty scarce.  I did hear of them traveling thousands of miles, and that they don't tend to hug the coastline like our Chinook seem to do.  Even still, you'd think salmon fishermen would hook into them every now and then, but you never really hear about it.

I've also heard of sea-run brook trout on the east coast, but I don't know anything about them.  And there are pictures online of absolutely MONSTER-sized sea-run browns coming from the UK and Argentina.  If they're as wary in the ocean as they are in freshwater, then it'd probably be near impossible to catch one in the salt.
aMayesing Bros.


fishloomis

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My guess is it started as a rumor because they get big a silver on the Trinity. I've noticed that that brown trout change their color to match their environment. I've caught chrome browns in new Zealand in crystal clear rivers that were blocked from the sea and they get huge. It seems unfathomable that with all the nets, fishing pressure and monitoring on the Trinity and Klamath that no one would observe a brown near the ocean.

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Poopsmith

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Has anyone actually ever caught a trout in the ocean?  I have always heard that it is next to impossible.  Never heard why exactly, just far-fetched sounding stuff that makes steelhead in the ocean sound more like the boogie man.  On any account... given the nature of rainbows, and their migratory habits, it really wouldn't surprise me to find out that most trout are at the very least "capable" of going to sea. 

here is my cutthroat thread from earlier this year, check out the ocean caught cutthroat by Clayman while salmon trolling.

http://www.norcalkayakanglers.com/index.php?topic=94532.msg1064602#msg1064602

Ive heard of steelhead caught by perch fisherman near mouths, and people seeing them behind the surf, but never trolling.

could an ocean run brown be a steelhead hybrid? it seems like cutbows could have gotten the ocean bug by the hybridization.

First step is to get a hook in the water

(I used to work at a wastewater plant)

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