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2017 AOTY/DOTY Entry

Topic: Best ways to overcome my fears...  (Read 834 times)

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Cchonggoo

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  • Location: Walnut creek
  • Date Registered: Sep 2017
  • Posts: 19
I m New to the sport n I m still nervous especially since I only went out to the bay and capsized...Lol.  What kinds of things can I work on to ensure my safety.  Thank you all in advance and some for such beginner questions.


crash

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  • Date Registered: Dec 2007
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Read the stickie threads in the safety forum.  The information in them can keep you upright and not dead.

http://www.norcalkayakanglers.com/index.php?board=47.0


Eddie

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I have a healthy form of fears every time I go out that hopefully keeps me safe. Be well and try to have a friend around if you can.  :smt006
Word to the wise if your mama aint' taught ya' "Don't stand in front of a man and a fish he aint' caught yet.  Brock Zeman song "I'm goin' fishin"

Jackson Kraken 15.7


HamachiJohn

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For me personally, the bay is more risky than the ocean, considering the current, winds, etc.  I think others in your previous post already shared their 2 cents on safety.  Take your yak out to a local lake/reservoir and practice self-rescue.  Then join us at Ocean Cove saturday for SimplyFishing tourney! 
Down to 1 Hobie Revo...


traildad

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  • Date Registered: Sep 2010
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The more time you spend on the water the better it will be. Get out on a lake on calm days. Before you know it you won't even think twice.
http://www.norcalkayakanglers.com/index.php?topic=42846.msg470404#msg470404

The charm of fishing is that it is the pursuit of what is elusive but attainable, a perpetual series of occasions for hope.  ~John Buchan


Tinker

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  • Date Registered: Dec 2015
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The same way you get to Carnegie Hall: practice, practice, practice.  I often think too many people - certainly no one in NCKA  :smt045  - are in too much of a rush to get into saltwater.  It helps to hang in freshwater a while until you really understand your kayak, especially learning what makes it tip over, and are feeling comfortable in it.

Read the thread crash suggested, it's a great start.  In addition to knowing how to get back on when it tips, I'd recommend you should be able to comfortably sit side-saddle on your kayak, because side-saddle allow us to reach into the rear tank well without reaching over our shoulder (which is almost guaranteed to put you in the water).

And never go alone!  That's common sense, and common sense is the #1 survival tool to bring with you.

(At some point in time, everyone was a newbie with newbie questions.  Don't hold back, ask whatever you want.)
« Last Edit: September 18, 2017, 03:28:09 AM by Tinker »
Wilderness Systems Tarpon 120
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poulton

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  • Date Registered: May 2011
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You don't say what kayak you were paddling when you capsized?
Sit in, or sit on top???????
Is the kayak the proper size for you??


Cchonggoo

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  • Date Registered: Sep 2017
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Thank you guys and sorry for my late reply.  I think I capsized because i got a snag while bouncing the bottom.  My drag was tight(forgot) and used too heavy of line in my weight so it didn't break off.  I have a hobi e outback bank Parker ed.  Just a little freaked out since it just happened so fast.  Thanks again everyone!!


Malibu_Two

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  • Date Registered: Jul 2005
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Don't skimp out on safety devices. When I first started kayak fishing (almost 20 years ago), we would go out without a radio, without a pump, without paddle leashes, without in-hull floatation, etc. All pretty dumb, in hindsight.
May the fish be mighty and the seas be meek...


Tinker

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  • Date Registered: Dec 2015
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Just a little freaked out since it just happened so fast.  Thanks again everyone!!

It always happens fast and that's what's so startling about it.  One minute you're having a great day and in a nanosecond you're in the water.  You might try going somewhere safe then fall out and get back in over-and-over until you figure you've mastered it - not the falling out part, just the shock of taking a surprise swim (it's what I did before I even thought about putting a kayak in the ocean).
Wilderness Systems Tarpon 120
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Ocean Kayak Trident 13


Spring45

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  • Date Registered: Feb 2017
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Sounds like you fish the salt. Try Half Moon Bay. Paddle around in the harbor (plenty of room), practice self rescue there.
Find some people in your area and fish in a group, tag-along. I've learned alot from meeting people from here.
Also, there are guides on here. Go with one of them. You'll have to fork out a couple bucks but I'm sure it's worth it.


KPD

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  • Location: San Mateo
  • Date Registered: Jul 2014
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Flipping is no big deal as long as you are prepared for it: dressed for immersion, ready to swim, and ready to self rescue.

This is a big advantage that our sit on top kayaks have over a lot of other boats. If your aluminum skiff flips you could be in a world of trouble.


yakyakyak

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Thank you guys and sorry for my late reply.  I think I capsized because i got a snag while bouncing the bottom.  My drag was tight(forgot) and used too heavy of line in my weight so it didn't break off.  I have a hobi e outback bank Parker ed.  Just a little freaked out since it just happened so fast.  Thanks again everyone!!

I recommend to not use any heavy line when kayak fishing. 20-30 lb lines are more than enough for most yakers.  Hali, shark, and sturgeon are outside those line range of course.  The idea is if it's too big, don't bother (I know some people would think I am crazy, but safety is always first and foremost).  I've caught 42 lbs fish on a 20 lb line. 

Also, +1 to what KPD said.



Santa Cruz Raptor G2 <--- Simply awesome (www.santacruzkayaks.com)



         


Cchonggoo

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Thank you everyone.   Looks like I have to get my wetsuit out and practice.   Thanks again!!


SmokeOnTheWater

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Snag + heavy line + high drag is guaranteed disaster.  You can fish heavy line, but just make sure you have your drag set so that if you do snag, it won't capsize you.

I had a close call in my earlier years when I had a rod in the rod holder set with heavy drag and a bat ray bit , in a matter of a second, my yak was ready to roll over until I quickly hit the lever drag on the reel.  That created one hell of a birdsnest on the reel though.   :smt044

Snags will happen often, so as long as you remember to set your drag properly before you fish, you should be fine.  If you have a tendency to forget, then use lighter line.

If you ain't first, you're last.

1st - 2013 Yakhopper Delta Madness (Bass)