Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
October 19, 2018, 04:06:55 AM

Login with username, password and session length

Recent Topics

[Today at 12:03:50 AM]

[Today at 12:03:08 AM]

[October 18, 2018, 10:40:27 PM]

[October 18, 2018, 10:19:48 PM]

[October 18, 2018, 10:08:01 PM]

[October 18, 2018, 09:49:15 PM]

[October 18, 2018, 09:13:52 PM]

[October 18, 2018, 08:59:17 PM]

[October 18, 2018, 08:16:21 PM]

[October 18, 2018, 07:40:42 PM]

[October 18, 2018, 07:36:14 PM]

[October 18, 2018, 05:58:38 PM]

[October 18, 2018, 04:18:02 PM]

[October 18, 2018, 03:52:29 PM]

[October 18, 2018, 02:07:11 PM]

[October 18, 2018, 12:51:49 PM]

[October 18, 2018, 12:33:32 PM]

[October 18, 2018, 09:25:14 AM]

[October 18, 2018, 08:49:45 AM]

[October 18, 2018, 08:13:32 AM]

[October 18, 2018, 07:55:54 AM]

by Jude
[October 17, 2018, 11:54:16 PM]

[October 17, 2018, 07:44:19 PM]

[October 17, 2018, 04:31:28 PM]

[October 17, 2018, 03:55:09 PM]

Support NCKA

Support the site by making a donation.

2018 AOTY/DOTY Entry

Topic: Ocean Frenzy 9' Ideal for ocean ?  (Read 1200 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Dk1992

  • Sand Dab
  • **
  • View Profile
  • Location: Bay area,Ca
  • Date Registered: Feb 2016
  • Posts: 83
quickly outgrew my starter lifetime 10' after my first trek onto the ocean. Looking into buy a kayak that is stable enough for the ocean.
Anyone have exprience with the Ocean Frenzy 9" its 9' x 31" and with my apartment living situation perfect for storage. I was also able to fit my 10' in back of my Tahoe without any top straps and would like to keep this ability with this kayak.

Will this one be suitable for HMB, SWS,etc on a decent day?

Thanks!


  • Cabeza de Martillo
  • View Profile
  • Location: San Jose
  • Date Registered: Jan 2011
  • Posts: 6492
I don't think so....you're going to be limited.
Pronounced in Spanish  ka·be·za de mar·t·yo
Translates to Hammerhead in English for my Gringo amigos.
....and yes that's me with a 6ft. green moray in the avatar.


"SPEAROS BEFORE HOES" - Silent Hunter


BigJim

  • A-Hull
  • Manatee
  • *****
  • No white flags.
  • View Profile
  • Location: Watsonville
  • Date Registered: Jun 2009
  • Posts: 14672
For short paddles and calm seas you would be ok...but a 12-16 foot kayak will give you a lot more options...

I've had plenty of fun in a 9 foot OK BigYak and still occasionally bust it out...but it really is limited in what it can do.

Just my 2 cents.

 :smt006

Sincerely,

Jim

~GS4  2010-1st~
~DOTY 2013-1st~
~T2B2 2015-1st~
~DOTY 2012-5th~DOTY 2014-5th~DOTY 2015-4th~DOTY 2016-7th~DOTY 2017-4th~


  • Cabeza de Martillo
  • View Profile
  • Location: San Jose
  • Date Registered: Jan 2011
  • Posts: 6492
Pronounced in Spanish  ka·be·za de mar·t·yo
Translates to Hammerhead in English for my Gringo amigos.
....and yes that's me with a 6ft. green moray in the avatar.


"SPEAROS BEFORE HOES" - Silent Hunter


AlexB

  • Sea Lion
  • ****
  • View Profile
  • Location: Oakland, CA
  • Date Registered: Mar 2011
  • Posts: 4736
Might be OK on a decent day. But, a decent day can turn sour really quickly. I think you'll be much happier with a kayak at least 10', with 12'+ being ideal.

Have you considered hanging the kayak from the ceiling? Or is it a matter of getting it up a staircase or elevator? Pully system out the window maybe? Now I'm just being ridiculous...


eelkram

  • Sea Lion
  • ****
  • it's my name, backwards
  • View Profile
  • Location: SFO
  • Date Registered: Dec 2013
  • Posts: 1451
Have you considered taking a Kayak class like the one offered out of HMB by CCK?  You can demo different kayaks during the class and you'll find that kayak stability is a function of your ability/comfort level.  Knowing you have the techniques to self rescue will increase your overall comfort level on the water and you'll think less about stability.  It really is a great class and confidence builder.

In terms of fishing HMB, I think you'd want to go the other direction with hull design.  I know that storage is a concern but HMB on a decent day can turn into a snotty day at the drop of a hat.  Even on a good day, the wind turns on in the afternoon and you'll find yourself paddling against the swell and wind to get back to the harbor.  A short, wide craft is going to kick your ass in big water. 

I got caught by rough seas outside of HMB while crabbing once.  I had a Hobie Outback which is roughly 12' and 33" wide, and even with the Mirage Drive, being loaded down with crab and crab traps, it took a long, long, time of constant, hard pedaling to get back to the jaws.  After that experience, I decided to move to more efficient hull designs and leave "stability" for freshwater sightfishing (ie. standing).  Your mileage may vary.

I think the consensus is that 13' to 15' kayaks are better for the salt.  Might as well plan ahead now because you'll likely be upgrading kayaks as you fish the salt more.  It's part of the madness.  :smt003   
'15 Viking ProFish Reload, wasp
'12 Hobie AI, skunk yellow
'12 Hobie Outfitter, dune (I'm the guy pedaling in the back)


Dk1992

  • Sand Dab
  • **
  • View Profile
  • Location: Bay area,Ca
  • Date Registered: Feb 2016
  • Posts: 83


Dk1992

  • Sand Dab
  • **
  • View Profile
  • Location: Bay area,Ca
  • Date Registered: Feb 2016
  • Posts: 83
Might be OK on a decent day. But, a decent day can turn sour really quickly. I think you'll be much happier with a kayak at least 10', with 12'+ being ideal.

Have you considered hanging the kayak from the ceiling? Or is it a matter of getting it up a staircase or elevator? Pully system out the window maybe? Now I'm just being ridiculous...

Its a duplex so i can store it in my backyard, I just like the convenience of being able to toss my yak in the back of the Tahoe and going. But I do have the roof rack and I guess this is the time to start using it.


Dk1992

  • Sand Dab
  • **
  • View Profile
  • Location: Bay area,Ca
  • Date Registered: Feb 2016
  • Posts: 83
Have you considered taking a Kayak class like the one offered out of HMB by CCK?  You can demo different kayaks during the class and you'll find that kayak stability is a function of your ability/comfort level.  Knowing you have the techniques to self rescue will increase your overall comfort level on the water and you'll think less about stability.  It really is a great class and confidence builder.

In terms of fishing HMB, I think you'd want to go the other direction with hull design.  I know that storage is a concern but HMB on a decent day can turn into a snotty day at the drop of a hat.  Even on a good day, the wind turns on in the afternoon and you'll find yourself paddling against the swell and wind to get back to the harbor.  A short, wide craft is going to kick your ass in big water. 

I got caught by rough seas outside of HMB while crabbing once.  I had a Hobie Outback which is roughly 12' and 33" wide, and even with the Mirage Drive, being loaded down with crab and crab traps, it took a long, long, time of constant, hard pedaling to get back to the jaws.  After that experience, I decided to move to more efficient hull designs and leave "stability" for freshwater sightfishing (ie. standing).  Your mileage may vary.

I think the consensus is that 13' to 15' kayaks are better for the salt.  Might as well plan ahead now because you'll likely be upgrading kayaks as you fish the salt more.  It's part of the madness.  :smt003

With the few handful of trips I've taken the bug has already bit! I'd like to get a Hobie but realistically can send between $500-$800. I also do plan to take the safety class soon but am staying relatively local until then : Lakes, bays and ocean in groups on a calm calm day.


AlexB

  • Sea Lion
  • ****
  • View Profile
  • Location: Oakland, CA
  • Date Registered: Mar 2011
  • Posts: 4736
I gotcha. If you're going to store a yak in the yard, make sure you keep the sun off of it. Also make sure it isn't heating up too much, like it might if you cover it with a dark colored tarp (the plastic hull softens and can sag/deform over time).

Good luck!


  • Old school or no school.
  • View Profile
  • Location: OAK
  • Date Registered: Dec 2014
  • Posts: 781
I owned an OK Frenzy for two, maybe three outings. Sold it immediately.

DO NOT TAKE IT IN THE OCEAN.

IME, it's a horrible product for anything other than recycling.  Loud hull slap, didn't track for shit, SLOOOOOW, difficult to outfit for fishing, and about as heavy as the 14' SOT I replaced it with.  There were also negatives.  (OK, maybe too harsh--I think it was designed for being thrown around by water: I've seen some cool footage of them being surfed, probably fun where you might go innertubing).

I took it out at Lake Chabot where it was almost OK, just super wet. Also once at the MLK shoreline by the OAK airport (shallow, fairly protected).  When the wind / small chop kicked up there, it was very difficult to get back to the launch.

Similarly to you, I got it thinking it'd be a good boat for carting in the minivan.  After dealing with this and my wife's first short kayak (10' Old Town Solitude), we went to 14' boats and installed roof racks.  Haven't looked back once.  If you want an easier to store thing for small freshwater, consider an inflatable (I've got a west marine K1 that's pretty fun once I put on a skeg), if you want to hit the ocean and not die, look for something > 12'.
14' Necky Dolphin, fast and wiggly, no room for anything.
Old Mitchell reel junkie.


Dk1992

  • Sand Dab
  • **
  • View Profile
  • Location: Bay area,Ca
  • Date Registered: Feb 2016
  • Posts: 83
I owned an OK Frenzy for two, maybe three outings. Sold it immediately.

DO NOT TAKE IT IN THE OCEAN.

IME, it's a horrible product for anything other than recycling.  Loud hull slap, didn't track for shit, SLOOOOOW, difficult to outfit for fishing, and about as heavy as the 14' SOT I replaced it with.  There were also negatives.  (OK, maybe too harsh--I think it was designed for being thrown around by water: I've seen some cool footage of them being surfed, probably fun where you might go innertubing).

I took it out at Lake Chabot where it was almost OK, just super wet. Also once at the MLK shoreline by the OAK airport (shallow, fairly protected).  When the wind / small chop kicked up there, it was very difficult to get back to the launch.

Similarly to you, I got it thinking it'd be a good boat for carting in the minivan.  After dealing with this and my wife's first short kayak (10' Old Town Solitude), we went to 14' boats and installed roof racks.  Haven't looked back once.  If you want an easier to store thing for small freshwater, consider an inflatable (I've got a west marine K1 that's pretty fun once I put on a skeg), if you want to hit the ocean and not die, look for something > 12'.

Awesome.. Thanks for this advice. Ive switched
My attnetion to the 11' OC for sale that was posted above.


Dk1992

  • Sand Dab
  • **
  • View Profile
  • Location: Bay area,Ca
  • Date Registered: Feb 2016
  • Posts: 83
I gotcha. If you're going to store a yak in the yard, make sure you keep the sun off of it. Also make sure it isn't heating up too much, like it might if you cover it with a dark colored tarp (the plastic hull softens and can sag/deform over time).

Good luck!

Thanks for the advice, I usually cover mine up with a moving blanket to prevent the hull softening you're talking about


  • Cabeza de Martillo
  • View Profile
  • Location: San Jose
  • Date Registered: Jan 2011
  • Posts: 6492
I also do plan to take the safety class soon but am staying relatively local until then : Lakes, bays and ocean in groups on a calm calm day.

If you aren't going to take a safety class make sure you practice self rescue until you are comfortable and efficient with it.

There's safety in numbers but you shouldn't rely on others to save you "when" not "if" you go for a swim.

Be safe and have fun  :smt001
Pronounced in Spanish  ka·be·za de mar·t·yo
Translates to Hammerhead in English for my Gringo amigos.
....and yes that's me with a 6ft. green moray in the avatar.


"SPEAROS BEFORE HOES" - Silent Hunter


Tinker

  • Salmon
  • ***
  • Kevin
  • View Profile
  • Location: Oregon
  • Date Registered: Dec 2015
  • Posts: 532
Well, you already know "NO" but there are some smaller kayaks that are fine for the sea - just limited in how far from shore you'll be able to safely go.  The short length makes them very twitchy in short-period swells, they ride over but don't cut through waves and get to be a handful real quickly.

The OK T11 is a great hull in almost any conditions.  If it's in your budget, go for it.
"The only person I know who does the yard sale without the huli." - Nobaddays