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2018 AOTY/DOTY Entry

Topic: Popularity of Fishing Skis in South Africa  (Read 2885 times)

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ChuckE

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It seems like fiberglass kayaks or "fishing skis" are much more popular in South Africa than the plastic boats we're use to seeing around here.

Is this a trend that could spread here?

Check out some these pics of fishing skis:















« Last Edit: October 15, 2006, 09:05:21 AM by ChuckE »

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bsteves

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It's interesting to read about these.  Sounds like an example of convergent evolution.   

The plastic sit-on-top fishing kayaks we use are based on traditional sit-inside kayak designs but modified for divers and people who can't eskimo roll.   Plastic seems the material of choice for mass market production and durability.  I'm not really sure why we don't have more fiberglass sit-on-top kayaks on the high end of the price range.

The fishing skis in South Africa on the other hand seem to have evolved out of fiberglass surf rescue skis that are used by lifeguards in Australia and South Africa.   Evidently they are making plastic fishing skis now as well.

The trade offs seem to be price, durability, internal storage, speed, and stability.  I really see these potentially taking off in Southern California and Hawaii more so than any other place in the country simply due to the presence of pelagic species that require a faster troll.   Maybe a bit up here in Northern California for salmon.  For the rest of us in the country, we really need stability over speed.  Rockfishing on the West Coast, redfish in the Gulf of Mexico and stripers in the North East are probably better off with a fishing kayak.  Some of the guys in the South East that fish redfish on the flats like to stand on their kayaks to cast, something that a fishing ski isn't going to be very good for.

Anyway, those are my general thoughts.  That said, I'd still love to have one.

Brian


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greg d

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notice how alot of those guys are also using "wing" paddles!   definitely not for the recreational fisherman.

as if the "skis" were not fast enough already.

thanks posting the photos chuck!

-g


ChuckE

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notice how alot of those guys are also using "wing" paddles!   definitely not for the recreational fisherman.

as if the "skis" were not fast enough already.

thanks posting the photos chuck!

-g
Good observation.  I've been using a winged paddle for years.  I don't think they were intended for use with the average fishing kayak, but I prefer it over any other paddle I've tried.  I think Sean "scwafish" is the only other kayak fisherman I know who uses one too.

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Winner "Grand Slam" - 2007 Bendo @ Mendo III
2nd Place - 2007 Monterey Bay Kayak Fishing Derby
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ChuckE

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More cool fishing ski pics from Stealth Performance Products...









Here's link to their line of skis.
http://www.stealthpp.co.za/Products.asp?product=1

Winner - 2013 Doran Beach Crabfest
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2nd Place - 2007 Monterey Bay Kayak Fishing Derby
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Travis

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That Grey Stealth looks pretty cool.  Suprising that they weight over 50lbs.


SBD

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From what I've gathered the word "ski" is used interchangably with kayak for any SOT in SA and Aussie.  Traditionally these folks paddled surf skis first, so while we look at them as narrow yaks, they see them as wide skis.  The MacSki style yaks are very popular anywhere there is a big surf launch involved and its easy to see why.

The stability issue is something that you eventually get used to, and its hard to go back to a regular SOT once you get used to the speed and efficiency.  The wing is another hypo surf ski carry over, they are awesome.  They only work well on shorter high-angle paddles, most of our yaks are too wide for the right dangle.  I love mine now that I'm used to it, but it too took a while.

I can see these gaining in popularity as some fisherman evolve into paddlers and some paddlers get inot fishing.  IMHO, the extra cost, care, wetness etc. will not have a broad appeal for some time.  I personally am addicted.  I am building a surf ski this winter, hope it comes out!


ChuckE

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Brian, Scwafish.... I think you guys are absolutely right on with your insights!

Designing and building your own surf or fishing ski/kayak would be so cool.  I'd love to learn how.

Winner - 2013 Doran Beach Crabfest
2nd Place tie - 2012 Alameda Rockwall Halibut Derby
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Winner - 2009 Alameda Rockwall Halibut Derby
Winner - 2009 Paradise Halibut Hunt
Winner - 2007 NCKA Angler of the Year
Winner "Grand Slam" - 2007 Bendo @ Mendo III
2nd Place - 2007 Monterey Bay Kayak Fishing Derby
Winner - 2004 Santa Cruz Kayak Fishing Derby


SBD

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Chuck-I won't be designing my own, I am going to lay one up using an existing mold that lives out in Elk with the local hardcore guys.  Laying it up will be a big enough challenge for me!


surfingmarmot

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I like the idea of a fibreglas fishing kayak, but I foresee us needing more storage and having it much more accessbile up here in NorCal. The hull design is fine at the waterline and below, its the deck and cockpit  I'd want to change.

Of course, I could just buy one used and modify it to see what works--fibreglas is not hard to repair, modify, or work with.