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2018 AOTY/DOTY Entry

Topic: It's a ____ salmon! Or...?  (Read 2833 times)

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rockfish

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That pinook looks like a few fish I have released on the American over the years :(
Do it until you scream, then a short pause is acceptable.
Mental?  perhaps


bmb

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I agree with you Chris on the odds.  The chances of it happening are slim that's for dang sure. But anything is possible.  A school of kings roam north to the coast of Washington and mix up with some other kings. A pinook gets mixed in, they flow south and stage off the Klamath mouth and just go up. The odds of that happening are slim at best. The odds of you catching one is even worse. You should have bought a lottery ticket.

The only other thought I would have is possibly a brown x Atlantic cross, but that seems even less likely. And like you said, the anal fin doesn't match a trout.

I did some research and they said that pinooks are caught in the PAC NW but people just don't talk about them a lot.  Was the year you caught that fish a pink year by chance? Of so I'd feel more confident. If not, unlikely but still possible.

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polepole

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I did some research and they said that pinooks are caught in the PAC NW but people just don't talk about them a lot.  Was the year you caught that fish a pink year by chance? Of so I'd feel more confident. If not, unlikely but still possible.

Of course a pinook may not stick to the 2 year cycles.  That one could be a 1 year pinook "jack".

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bmb

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Could be. And also if its a pinook it might choose to follow a king cycle, 3, 4 or 5 year!

I say that since I know zero about pinook biology. It doesn't seem like there's been much research on it.

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bmb

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What would have helped (other than doing a mtDNA analysis) would be knowing how old the fish is and determining whether there was a big pink run the year of fertilization.  A large pink run with a few female Chinook laying eggs could result in a cross. The one abstract I read said that pinooks are supposedly asymmetrical in that they take more traits of Chinook than pink, and that they are generally result of a maternal Chinook and paternal pink, which makes some sense to me if you're talking about a huge run of humpies.  I've also seen pics of male pinooks (chumpies) which look....um...challenged.

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bmb

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By the way all of my knowledge of salmon biology I learned from an episode of futurama where fry and leela were salmon.

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rockfish

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OK, well I change my ID.  I just got off the phone with ATD and he said without a pause or hesitation that he thinks Chinook.  Since he has seen many thousands of these from hatchery to grave I'll go with him.  But we agreed that its best to release because it only takes one warden looking at the gums to write a ticket and he (ATD) is not always available for deposition to help in court...
Do it until you scream, then a short pause is acceptable.
Mental?  perhaps


trianglelaguna

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I have not trout fished in years but the first thing I saw was a "brown trout that was going into a mating morph"

I agree

    Quote from Wizz

Looks like a sea run brown to me. Ive actually caught those on all but 2 trips to the trinity.
« Last Edit: March 12, 2014, 08:15:49 AM by trianglelaguna »
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Clayman

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Internet research (Internet is so awesome  :smt004) shows the strongest runs of pinks in Washington state run in odd-numbered years.  This fish was caught in 2011, so it was indeed a year for returning pink salmon.  As far as I'm aware, there is very little variation in the life history of pinks--most fish immediately outmigrate to sea after emergence and will return two years later.  There are no such things as pink "jacks" or pinks older than 2 years old, so there's no genetic mingling among runs (not counting strays).  That's why odd-numbered years in Washington state show strong runs that don't contribute to the runs of even-numbered years.

A 1-year old pinook "jack" is highly unlikely.  The only scenario I could see this occurring is if the fish ignored its immediate urge to outmigrate from the river like a pink salmon would, and remained in the river for one year to develop into a precocious male parr, or "mini jack".  This has been observed in Chinook.  But "mini jacks", given that they remain in the river their entire life and are only a year old, are very small dudes.  There's no way they could grow to the size of the fish in question within one year.

As for a brown trout: again, I really think the anal fin rules it out.  Anal fins that are a lot wider than long are found on Pacific salmon.  Trout have anal fins that are about as wide as they are long.  Unless someone digs up a photo of a brown trout with a really wide, short anal fin, then I won't ignore this trait.  I've caught a fair number of brown trout from the Trinity.  None of them looked like the fish in question.  Though I can't say for sure whether the browns were actually "sea run" or not.

By the way all of my knowledge of salmon biology I learned from an episode of futurama where fry and leela were salmon.

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I need to see that episode  :smt003.
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polepole

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As far as I'm aware, there is very little variation in the life history of pinks--most fish immediately outmigrate to sea after emergence and will return two years later. 

Useless fact of the day alert.  Pinks are an odd bunch.  The genetic differences between even and odd year fish in WA are more than the genetic differences between same year fish in SE AK vs. WA.  Seems there is more genetic intermingling across distance rather than time.

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sharky

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How did it taste? That's how I distinguish between a steelhead and a salmon.

By the way, this is a joke.


Clayman

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As far as I'm aware, there is very little variation in the life history of pinks--most fish immediately outmigrate to sea after emergence and will return two years later. 

Useless fact of the day alert.  Pinks are an odd bunch.  The genetic differences between even and odd year fish in WA are more than the genetic differences between same year fish in SE AK vs. WA.  Seems there is more genetic intermingling across distance rather than time.

-Allen
They really are a fascinating abberation among Pacific salmon.  While you see a lot of variation in life histories of most Pacific salmon (years spent in FW as juveniles, years spent in ocean, age at spawning, different run timings, etc.), pinks seem to have the most "rigid" life history of all of them, opting to use a short life span and sheer numbers to survive as a species.  Ironically, they seem to be doing the best of all salmon, with talk of there being "too many pinks" in the ocean waters of the PNW.  They're competing for resources with other salmon species, and since they're considered an "inferior" salmon for the table, do not command a high market price like Chinook or sockeye.

How did it taste? That's how I distinguish between a steelhead and a salmon.

By the way, this is a joke.
You'd have to pay me to eat that beast  :smt044.
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fisheducator

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" It's a fish !!!"  :smt044, a nice one at that. Interesting read also.
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SmokeOnTheWater

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Interesting fish for sure.  I recall seeing a similar thread a while back on the sniffer I think and they concluded it was a chinook as well.

In any case, this thread has been extremely educational for me.  Thanks!
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Sin Coast

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Ooooo I just had another theory to add to our list...could it have washed down from Lewiston? Did it spill in 2010/11?
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