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2017 AOTY/DOTY Entry

Topic: Chub?  (Read 1146 times)

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SandBag

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Caught this at eagle lake late summer in 2010. I know the lake contains a large amount of tui chub but have only heard of them getting this size. My second thought was some type of sucker but the mouth was not evident of that. Anyone know?


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SandBag

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I've caught many pikeminnow I don't believe that's what this is.

It was very dark brown on the back and all squaws I've caught are much more silver. This fish also had a much smaller mouth than squaw and the tail fork is not nearly as deep. Not to mention it's fotball shape and thick head also points away from squaw. On top of all that I've never heard of squaws in eagle or most cold high elevation lakes.

I guess dif conditions could cause different growth and appearance of a fish so not impossible but I have strong doubt it's a squawfish.


Kayote

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Looks like a classic sucker to me. Not sure what species. Update. Did a quick search of Eagle Lake and it appears you have a Tahoe sucker (Catostomus tahoensis). Here is the article.

>> Lassen County
Eagle Lake Osprey Management Area
Map     Satellite

Long a favorite breeding ground of the osprey, Pandion haliaetus, this portion of the Lassen National Forest is now managed as an osprey nesting area. Past fluctuations in the water level of the lake resulted in a number of dead trees which provide nesting sites; this, coupled with the easily available fish in Eagle Lake, have led to an unusually high concentration of ospreys. Their food here is primarily tui chub, Gila bicolor, followed by Eagle Lake trout, Salmo gairdneri aquilarum (see Eagle Lake), and Tahoe suckers, Catostomus tahoensis.

Vegetation in this area includes Sierra juniper, Juniperus occidentalis, Jeffrey pine, Pinus jeffreyi, and common sagebrush, Artemisia tridentata.

Integrity: The area has been logged and grazed and flooded. Now managed to protect the ospreys, the Forest Service has topped trees and installed poles with nesting platforms to increase the number of nesting sites. In 1972 the ospreys preferred the poles to the old nesting sites by a four to one ratio.

Use: Observation, research. Access limited during breeding season, April 1 to September 15.

Ref: Kahl, J. R., 1971. Osprey Habitat Management Plan. Unpublished report. Lassen National Forest, Susanville, California.
Ray, M. S., 1915. Nesting of the American Osprey at Eagle Lake, California. Condor 17, p. 70-74.

May 1975

Here's a pic:
http://www.fishbase.tw/Summary/SpeciesSummary.php?ID=2980&AT=Tahoe+sucker
« Last Edit: February 08, 2012, 02:22:57 PM by Kayote »
So I'm packing my bags for the Misty Mountains, where the spirits go...........


GrumpyBass

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I'm not lost. I'm looking for fish.


SandBag

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Sucker is where my guess lies but the only non sucker thing about was the forward orinented mouth.


crash

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That is a big tui chub.


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At first i thought it was a sucker.  I'm pretty sure its not a tui chub.  Here's a pic of an eagle lake tui chub.



SandBag

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Did some further research and looked at some pics online, full grown chub is what it looks to be

Are tui chubs the only type of chub in eagle? I believe they plant a few types of small fish native to lake tahoe.


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I think there's lots of random fish species in Eagle.  Could it be a Tahoe Sucker?


SandBag

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Looks like a classic sucker to me. Not sure what species. Update. Did a quick search of Eagle Lake and it appears you have a Tahoe sucker (Catostomus tahoensis). Here is the article.

>> Lassen County
Eagle Lake Osprey Management Area
Map     Satellite

Long a favorite breeding ground of the osprey, Pandion haliaetus, this portion of the Lassen National Forest is now managed as an osprey nesting area. Past fluctuations in the water level of the lake resulted in a number of dead trees which provide nesting sites; this, coupled with the easily available fish in Eagle Lake, have led to an unusually high concentration of ospreys. Their food here is primarily tui chub, Gila bicolor, followed by Eagle Lake trout, Salmo gairdneri aquilarum (see Eagle Lake), and Tahoe suckers, Catostomus tahoensis.

Vegetation in this area includes Sierra juniper, Juniperus occidentalis, Jeffrey pine, Pinus jeffreyi, and common sagebrush, Artemisia tridentata.

Integrity: The area has been logged and grazed and flooded. Now managed to protect the ospreys, the Forest Service has topped trees and installed poles with nesting platforms to increase the number of nesting sites. In 1972 the ospreys preferred the poles to the old nesting sites by a four to one ratio.

Use: Observation, research. Access limited during breeding season, April 1 to September 15.

Ref: Kahl, J. R., 1971. Osprey Habitat Management Plan. Unpublished report. Lassen National Forest, Susanville, California.
Ray, M. S., 1915. Nesting of the American Osprey at Eagle Lake, California. Condor 17, p. 70-74.

May 1975

Here's a pic:
http://www.fishbase.tw/Summary/SpeciesSummary.php?ID=2980&AT=Tahoe+sucker

Ok Im pretty sure this it, the pic in the link seems a bit lighter( maybe dead) but the description is spot on.

Also did some more research on eagle, I guess I was wrong there is a lot in there, also read that before the alkilinity level skyrocketed in the sixties from being drained, many species were planted including crappie bluegill and lmbs.


Uminchu Naoaki

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Looks like a classic sucker to me. Not sure what species. Update. Did a quick search of Eagle Lake and it appears you have a Tahoe sucker (Catostomus tahoensis). Here is the article.

>> Lassen County
Eagle Lake Osprey Management Area
Map     Satellite

Long a favorite breeding ground of the osprey, Pandion haliaetus, this portion of the Lassen National Forest is now managed as an osprey nesting area. Past fluctuations in the water level of the lake resulted in a number of dead trees which provide nesting sites; this, coupled with the easily available fish in Eagle Lake, have led to an unusually high concentration of ospreys. Their food here is primarily tui chub, Gila bicolor, followed by Eagle Lake trout, Salmo gairdneri aquilarum (see Eagle Lake), and Tahoe suckers, Catostomus tahoensis.

Vegetation in this area includes Sierra juniper, Juniperus occidentalis, Jeffrey pine, Pinus jeffreyi, and common sagebrush, Artemisia tridentata.

Integrity: The area has been logged and grazed and flooded. Now managed to protect the ospreys, the Forest Service has topped trees and installed poles with nesting platforms to increase the number of nesting sites. In 1972 the ospreys preferred the poles to the old nesting sites by a four to one ratio.

Use: Observation, research. Access limited during breeding season, April 1 to September 15.

Ref: Kahl, J. R., 1971. Osprey Habitat Management Plan. Unpublished report. Lassen National Forest, Susanville, California.
Ray, M. S., 1915. Nesting of the American Osprey at Eagle Lake, California. Condor 17, p. 70-74.

May 1975

Here's a pic:
http://www.fishbase.tw/Summary/SpeciesSummary.php?ID=2980&AT=Tahoe+sucker

Ok Im pretty sure this it, the pic in the link seems a bit lighter( maybe dead) but the description is spot on.

http://calfish.ucdavis.edu/species/?uid=98&ds=241
I too agree.