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2018 AOTY/DOTY Entry

Topic: sturgeon anchoring  (Read 4123 times)

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SBD

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Mine is basically like Shimmys but I don't use a clip, I just pass the line through the float loop.  I also have an open top cleat so there is no way a tangle can prevent ditching the anchor.  It has been my experience that with a 5-pound anchor, there is no need for an additional weight, salmon balls are needed on 3 and 1.5 pound folding anchors.  This set-up is super basic and very effective.


fishshim

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[/quote]
I use the same set-up as Fishim but my rope is a bungee instead of static line. It will absorb impact better and has a weaker breaking strength. Carabiners are a weak link in the salt unless you spring for the big buck powder coated ones and maintain them vigorously with corossion lock. Brass is the better maritime alternative. The jam cleat is a good way to go but a cam cleat is smaller and can be reversed. It's holding power is twice as good but it cost three times as much at the sailing parts store. I've said many times before and will concur again that a bombproof quick release system is essential when anchoring a fishing kayak in any water.
Hawk is right about carabiners and the need to break away easy(for safety). The clips below water are marine stainless that I oil once a year whether they need it or not. The alum. one on the float is above water most of the time and really doesn't need to open to work. I was going to add bungie but the skinny nylon is so stretchy it works fine. The jam cleat works great one handed and is also used for my drift anchor rig. I can lower,raise, or dump the anchor with one hand. I looked at other set-ups trolleys,etc. but this seemed to be the best K.I.S.S. system for my infrequent anchoring.


Tote

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The simplicity of this setup is awesome! Great work to the inventor!! I'm really considering this system for the Caddyak.
Only question I have to all those who use them is how easy is it to reset? Do you need to shimmy all the way to the back of the yak to get that rope that's attached to the stern or is there a better technique?
Z

Hey Z~
Brian is right. Just a few strokes backwards and the float comes right to ya. Just make sure you paddle so the float comes along the same side as your quick release rope.
if it gets REALLy rippi' out there you can always break loose and paddle back to get it. Or come back another day when it isn't so bad. :smt044
<=>


mickfish

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Last nite I came up with a pretty simple foolproof release. I was using a borrowed Kayak I didn't want to make any changes to.
I used a quick release strap sorta like the old style safety belts, it can be attached anywhere. I attached it to a little strap loop that was all ready on the handle that the release won't fit thru works great won't rust can be use to attach other things and it doesn't bang against the side of the yak in choppy water like a metal clip does. Sorry for the blurry photo I guess my cam doesn't like Mango. If there is any intrest I can take some more tomorrow.
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swellrider

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Mike That's a good choice for a quick release. All of my waist worn tow systems use this buckle but they have added this little ball so in hectic situations you can release it easier. This innovation came out of whitewater kayaking where river guides saw a need for an addition to such buckles. It might be overkill for a fishing kayak but I bet by next year we'll all be charging class IV standing up, it could come in handy.

I've used this Biner in the salt for the last five years and it's held up well but is now pretty tight at the hinge. It cost more but has outlasted all of my aluminum biners. The plastic piece can hold the gate open and the lip is toothless so line can't catch.
« Last Edit: February 04, 2008, 08:58:12 PM by swellrider »
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jonesz

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Ok, I've been thinking about this "quick release system" subject for a while, and I've looked at all these pulley and beaner systems. Looks like a lot more complicated than it needs to be. I'm thinking KIS here. How about an upright fork at the rear of your yak that you can place the line in to direct it out the back after dropping the anchor, and then secure the line in your jam cleat next to your seat. Tie a float on the end of the line. Then when you have to release for a sleigh ride, just pull it up out of the cleat, raise your arm to clear the fork and throw it overboard. this could be performed with one hand very quickly. Too simple...? Thoughts?


fishshim

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Jonesz  as long as you could put the line in the hook that should work fine, keep in mind swinging with the wind and tide.
 
If you know the depth you are anchoring all you need is a quick release, enough line wrapped around a buoy tied to an anchor, no winder.


ZeeHawk

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Hey Z~
Brian is right. Just a few strokes backwards and the float comes right to ya. Just make sure you paddle so the float comes along the same side as your quick release rope.
if it gets REALLy rippi' out there you can always break loose and paddle back to get it. Or come back another day when it isn't so bad. :smt044

Done! Rigging it up! Thanks Tote/Bsteves

Z


FisHunter

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I've looked at all these pulley and beaner systems.
Hey!!!...mine works great!  and it IS simple! :smt044
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Tote

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Ok, I've been thinking about this "quick release system" subject for a while, and I've looked at all these pulley and beaner systems. Looks like a lot more complicated than it needs to be. I'm thinking KIS here. How about an upright fork at the rear of your yak that you can place the line in to direct it out the back after dropping the anchor, and then secure the line in your jam cleat next to your seat. Tie a float on the end of the line. Then when you have to release for a sleigh ride, just pull it up out of the cleat, raise your arm to clear the fork and throw it overboard. this could be performed with one hand very quickly. Too simple...? Thoughts?

That was exactly my first design. I tested it out at Sailor Bar on the American and it seemed to work fine. I used it during the sturgeon derby and it SUCKED @SS big time!!! DO NOT DO THIS.
I even removed the photos I posted of this.
When the current is ripping it is a BEOTCH to get the rope in the fork. You have to turn around way too much to even make an attempt. The rope WILL get tangled around the fork. Not too much fun sliding all the way to the very rear of the kayak in ripping current to get it untangled.
It is a horrible design and will cause you nothing but grief. I try a lot of different ideas and have NO problem admitting when one sucks. This one sucks. Learn from my mistake.
The release system I use now is far superior to that. It is much easier to use, much easier to install and a lot safer all around.
<=>


swellrider

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Thanks for posting that Tote, we've all tried things that seem good on paper but don't work so well when the rubber meets the road. Trial and error is all we have in this still young sport.
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